I FAILED. I QUIT. AND THAT’S OK.

I’ve literally been writing drafts of this post for over 16 months.

Seriously. It says: created on 18th January 2015. How ridiculous is that?

It’s been a tough post for me to write, because it mainly involves me sucking up my pride and admitting I failed at something. Which I’m not really good at.

And not only failed, but gave up. QUIT.

(Dun, dun, duuuuuuun.)

Because it’s not really the done thing really is it? To quit. It means you were weak. You didn’t hold out. It represents failure. You weren’t good enough, so you gave up.

Don’t ever give up on your dream. Isn’t that what they all say?

Well you know what?

I failed. I wasn’t good enough. I quit.

And that’s OK.

little miss katy

I started acting when I was 7 years old. I was a lily flower and a piece of seaweed and a slithy tove in a local production of Alice in Wonderland. (Yes, a slithy tove is a thing. It involved me wearing a grey robe, red deely boppers and a black mask to scare the Knave of Hearts off stage. It was ace.)

I’d been bitten by the acting bug and I knew that acting was what I wanted to do. What I was MEANT to do. Nothing else interested me.

My whole life revolved around whatever show we were working on that term, and all my best friends were from the theatre group. I never even considered a different career path.

Eventually, I came to the UK and studied for a BA (Hons) in Musical Theatre.

I worked hard for those three years. Like, REALLY hard. Not just singing, dancing and acting, but business studies, events management, contextual history modules and even a (totally unhelpful) self-employment course.

14 hour days during show weeks were the norm. I wrote essays at 2 o’clock in the morning, after working an 8 hour shift at the pub in my part-time job. I toured the South East for two weeks as Cinderella in Into The Woods, getting up every day at 6am to travel for hours to each venue, setting up, rehearsing, doing the show and travelling back again to go to sleep at 1am… only to do it all again the next day.

And I LOVED it.

I was so passionate and so determined that this was the right path for me.

I graduated with a first class degree. I spent a fortune on headshots, envelopes, postage, more singing lessons and a Spotlight subscription. I applied to hundreds of agents.

I worked late shifts at a Wetherspoons in zone 6, pulling pints for creepy old men and pouring sambucca shots for loud and obnoxious teenagers. I got up early to apply for auditions, email agents and generally try to get SOME form of acting work. I managed to get a couple of short film gigs. None of them paid, obviously…

I invested EVERYTHING in that dream.

But a few months later, I still had no agent. I was constantly tired, constantly broke and I was sick to the back teeth of the creepy men and obnoxious teenagers. I was getting about three auditions a month on average, had done 2 acting “jobs” (not paid) in 6 months, and my self-confidence was at an all-time low.

I still loved the actual acting, but everything else about “the dream” was making me utterly miserable.

And one day I decided I’d had enough.

So I quit.

little miss katy

I actually called my decision to quit “a break”. For months.

I called it that because I didn’t want to admit failure. I didn’t want to admit that things like having money and free time and being able to go out and eat in restaurants and travel and go to the theatre and meet new people meant more to me than “my dream”.

I didn’t want to admit that, actually, I wasn’t good enough.

I wasn’t. And that’s the hard truth of it.

Which I can now admit quite happily. But at the time, the thought of having to publicly admit failure was just not something I could deal with. You may or may not have noticed, but I’ve got a really bad habit of caring too much what people think about me…

But you know what? Quitting acting is the best decision I’ve ever made in my life.

(Seriously. I know I’m prone to exaggeration, but this is not one of those times.)

Within two weeks of making my choice, I’d bagged myself a job as a well-paid receptionist in central London. I found a room in a nice flat in a nice area that I could actually afford. I actually had time to go out and meet people and go on dates. And on my second ever online date (about three weeks after quitting), I met my current boyfriend.

I was able to go to the theatre and out for dinner. I could travel and buy new clothes and work out.

And MAN it felt good.

I was able to start a blog… which lead me to where I am now. Both literally and metaphorically.

Blogging has started out in a very similar vein to acting for me. It’s a hobby that I adore, which might, hopefully one day, become a career that I love.

But I’ve learnt from the past and I’m fully prepared to accept that this might not ever blossom into something more (eurgh, I’m making this sound like a date…)

So I’m going to try my best to make my blog a success. I’m going to work as hard as I can at it, and I’ll either succeed or I’ll fail. But I’m going to keep on trying until I no longer love it and it no longer makes me happy.

Because if there’s ANYTHING I’ve realised in the past few weeks of loss and sadness and fuming anger at the world, is that life is too fucking short to not be doing something you love.

And I’m not entirely sure where this is going anymore, so on that note: I’m off to drink gin and watch Family Guy. Because no one ever told me that baring your soul to the internet was quite so mentally draining.

Merry bank holiday to all, and to all a good night.

Or something.

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  • I adore you <3

  • Ahhhh KATY you absolute babe. YOU are an epic human being who absolutely deserves everything you get. So GO YOU! xxx

  • I totally get this. I mean, technically I still intend to work in the same industry with my impending job change, but there are a few things that are different from the last time I went looking for a job. I remember having lofty dreams of being the kind of designer that lives and breathes it and is well known and works the conference circuit. But now I really am content to do a job I enjoy to make the money I need to live a comfortable life with my girlfriend. It took a lot to realize that I didn’t need to be the most successful at everything. I just need to be content in what I am doing. :)

    Aisling | anthologie.

  • Helen

    Excellent post. Trying and *then* failing is not failing. The failing is in never having the guts to try. Better to try and fail then never have given it a bash in the first place! xxx

  • The best of us quit acting 😉 Xx

    • Boo. Can you and Katy do a two woman show? PLEEEEEEEAAAAASE. Even if it’s just for me. But not in a creepy way. I can’t tell what’s creepy any more, I’ve had a wine. But you two entertain me. That’s what I’m trying to say. Maybe.

  • You definitely didn’t fail. I tried being a scientist, I loved it, but the bad moments, poor salary and lack of anyone wanting me to post doc in their lab for them kinda hit it for me. I’m now (hopefully- I haven’t started yet) found a job that’s about science but not science itself, maybe it’s the right move?! Maybe it isn’t?! I’ll try again and see what happens. I’d love to blog FT but I think I’d end up hating it and that scares me, plus my blog is so very small!!

  • Charlie Elliott

    So super proud of you xxx

  • Its not failing if you tried. Its a hard hard career choice, I’ve attempted to give it up many times but always go back. This year I decided that I’m giving it one final big shot at making a go of it and have now got an agent and getting paid work and auditions. But its hard and tiring and I totally get it. Well done for being honest to yourself first and foremost before anything else x

  • Um, you totally didn’t fail. Just sayin’ xx

  • I couldn’t love this post more if I tried. I had the worst happen to me as an MSc by research student back in September, 9 months into a 12 month course: have my project taken off me. I still believe, to give to someone else. Part of me actually wish I quit then, I’m no longer doing what I love, I would be emotionally and financially better off. But I didn’t, hopefully it’ll be done with in the next few weeks, I wasn’t happy on wasting the 9 months of work I had done but unknowingly committed to another 9 months so I refused to give up, there’s nothing wrong with quitting.

    http://Www.kathyathy.com

  • Sam

    Oh Katy, I love this. You know what, I used to think musical theatre was for me. I was a classically trained singer, county jazz singer and musician. Singing was my life. But I just decided I wasn’t good enough and looked for a more ‘suitable’ job – the thing is, I still sing but I do it as a hobby and I’m so glad it is just a hobby. Sometimes when your hobby becomes your job, it’s no fun anymore and you have nothing to do for fun. I don’t think you’ve failed if you’ve made the best decision of you life – I think that’s a pretty f*cking amazing outcome, don’t you? xxx

    Sam // What I Know Now

  • Sam

    Oh Katy, I love this. You know what, I used to think musical theatre was for me. I was a classically trained singer, county jazz singer and musician. Singing was my life. But I just decided I wasn’t good enough and looked for a more ‘suitable’ job – the thing is, I still sing but I do it as a hobby and I’m so glad it is just a hobby. Sometimes when your hobby becomes your job, it’s no fun anymore and you have nothing to do for fun. I don’t think you’ve failed if you’ve made the best decision of you life – I think that’s a pretty f*cking amazing outcome, don’t you? xxx

    Sam // What I Know Now

  • Thanks for this post Katy, it’s so hard giving up and letting something go, especially when you’ve worked so hard for it. But sometimes it’s not about sticking with something just because we’ve invested in it in the past – the future might have other ideas! xxx
    Lucy @ La Lingua | Food, Travel, Italy

  • Thanks for this post Katy, it’s so hard giving up and letting something go, especially when you’ve worked so hard for it. But sometimes it’s not about sticking with something just because we’ve invested in it in the past – the future might have other ideas! xxx
    Lucy @ La Lingua | Food, Travel, Italy

  • I went to Chichester uni the year after you did. I took the Performing Arts course, and did exactly what you did – I dreamed so hard to act. I found you online, with your website, spotlight and other things because we were at the same uni. I followed your story (and now I sound creepy) because I had nobody to talk to, nobody else who was doing the same with the same passion. When you started your blog I was already following on Twitter so I followed you here. I graduated uni last year, and with a heavy heart I have not even tried to go to auditions. I have not even had the guts to try a single one since graduating. Will I ever try? Maybe one day. I think that’s the most important point: giving up doesn’t always mean forever! Maybe you or I could do a few auditions every few years or extra work, because we are passionate about acting on our days off and actually get paid. Sure it’s not “the dream” but that’s okay. This is what I have learnt. It’s not forever, it’s for now. I just want to let you know that you are not alone. Sharnie x

  • Bravo for finishing this post, and as always, this is such a burst of positivity! Life doesn’t always pan out the way we want to, and that’s okay. Because it ain’t over til it’s over and when it’s over, that’s the time we fall in love with something else again. Keep being you, Katy. The world needs more positive people like you.

    Honey x The Girl Next Shore

  • Polkadot Pink

    Sorry to hear that you didn’t get your acting break. However, didn’t you find another talent in blogging? A new talent that you also excelled in and this one gave you a break and gave you a work life balance? It’s hard to let go of things we think we’re destined for (for me, teaching) but one day, you may return to it. Never say never xx

  • Polkadot Pink

    Sorry to hear that you didn’t get your acting break. However, didn’t you find another talent in blogging? A new talent that you also excelled in and this one gave you a break and gave you a work life balance? It’s hard to let go of things we think we’re destined for (for me, teaching) but one day, you may return to it. Never say never xx

  • lilacfloats

    This post really resonates with me. I dropped out of uni during Freshers and it has led me to a career I adore, coaching gymnastics. It’s a struggle at times, and I have 4 jobs, but I wouldn’t change the way things have turned out. Katy, you are amazing and it’s OK for plans to change. X

  • When I was younger I also thought acting was what my life was destined for. I joined a musical theatre class, was constantly researching agents, and even begged my parents to let me take dramas GCSE. When I got a C in it, I realised I perhaps wasn’t as good as I thought. I think it was quite sad at the time giving up on my ‘dream’, but now I’ve realised it wasn’t my dream at all. Since then I’ve gotten into one of the top unis in the country and am going to graduate into a job in investment banking this summer whilst doing blogging part-time / on the side (which I absolutely love). So I understand you completely!! Sometimes life just takes you down a different path than expected. My ultimate dream is to have my own businesses, be my own boss and brand myself and it seems a lot more achievable than acting ever did!

    Good luck for the future, really enjoyed this post!

    http://Skylish.co.uk

  • Super proud of you for writing this. You are an amazing person with the best positivity. It doesn’t always work out but it takes guts to actually acknowledge that and work towards a new dream. You are a mega babe! xxx

  • This is a fantastic post, Katy. Loved reading it, and love how down to earth and positive you are! Making the decision to quit and take another path is really, really brave, and look where it got you! Life doesn’t always pan out as you plan, but things always work out in the end!

    Mimmi xx
    Muted Mornings

  • Wow, this is so honest and open and I love you for writing it! I have been in a similar situation and it hurts to admit that maybe you’re just not good enough .. but sometimes you just gotta see the truth even if it hurts ..

  • As I said on fb, this is great. Part of adulthood is learning to go where the path takes you, right?

  • What a beautifully honest post Katy. It’s so great that you’re back to full swing blogging! I’ve really missed reading your posts regularly.

    I don’t think this makes you a quitter or a failure for that matter. If anything you were extremely brave to admit that it was time for new and better things xx

    Ioanna | hearting.co.uk

  • Anastasia

    Quitting doesn’t necessary mean failing!

    It means you are mature enough to stop spending energy on something that is not proving to be good along your life pathway!

    I had a very, VERY tough PhD experience a few years back-sexual harassment and bullying on steroids, that made me spent 2 years of my life before quitting-which I’d love to share at some point and open the eyes of female students but I am just to shy to do it just now. I applause you for writing this and having the strength to change your career direction
    xx
    http://natbeesfashion.blogspot.com

  • Bivisyani Q.

    When I spotted this post on Facebook, I knew instantly that this is what I should be reading right now. I’ve been on the same boat myself: two years ago, after 3 years of trying to make it as a design student in Germany—being rejected repeatedly and running low on cash—I finally decided to go home. All the time I was studying something else—Art History—but it wasn’t as fulfilling as illustration would be. It was short of enough that I sometimes fooled myself into thinking that it would be enough. Not only that, my living condition wasn’t optimal but I found it way too hard to change my current circumstances…before I finally packed my bags for the last time and went home.

    People ask all the time why I quit. Wasn’t it a shame? Weren’t those years wasted? Couldn’t you just continue on? But I don’t see it that way although sometimes they managed to persuade me into seeing their point-of-view. Being an illustrator has been something I’ve wanted to do my whole life. It was REALLY hard to hear school after school practically saying I wasn’t good enough. For a long time, I didn’t feel like drawing at all. What was the point of life anymore?

    I didn’t have a plan when I arrived home. Nor was I overly excited to have one too. But now I can finally see that all these incidents, they need to happen to shape me into who I am now. And I can finally say I am happy with my choice—although I still miss Germany and my boyfriend who still stays there. It is worth the while and some things need to fall for better things to grow. I so believe in that and I’m glad you see that way too. May we both grow into better people and reach whatever goal we will have now and in the future!

    Alive as Always

  • ninegrandstudent

    This was such a good post, wish it was around months ago! For the last few months I’ve been facing graduating without a job to go to. I’d worked myself to the bone for my degree (seriously, I finished exams on Tuesday and my under-eye circles are ridiculous!), I’d got excellent work experience, but I was ‘too experienced’ for grad schemes, but not quite experienced enough for a non-grad job. I got told my degree gave me ‘too many’ exemptions from professional exams, I even got told my engagement ring put them off (I responded with a ‘wouldn’t want to work for a company with such thoughts then’ – but it still stung). I was terrified of leaving without getting a job, worried I was going to have to settle for a job I didn’t really want to do. I wasn’t sleeping, was having some stupid thoughts and it was all because I was scared to admit I failed.

    I’m fortunate that pretty much at the last minute I ended up with not one but two job offers, and yes it made all the tears worthwhile, but the feeling of being scared to fail is still there! x

    NINEGRANDSTUDENT: A Student Lifestyle Blog

  • Ryan Hayes

    I loved this post. We did a short film together a few years back. You were a great actress to work with. Comfortable, not phased, spontaneous and uninhibited by what was going on around you. It’s a loss to the industry. I hope you return at some point. But in the mean time I wish you all the best in the near future.
    Ryan Hayes X

  • Samantha Langan

    Love this! I recently quit my 9 to 5 job because I couldnt take it anymore. Doing something that I didn’t love was bringing me down.
    Now that I’m a free agent I am having a go at getting back into my photography. I’ve come alive again and want to see and do more.
    Would love meet up with you and have a chat. You’re really inspiring and would love to get some tips of you with blogging.
    Samantha Eloise xx

  • Samantha Langan

    Love this! I recently quit my 9 to 5 job because I couldnt take it anymore. Doing something that I didn’t love was bringing me down.
    Now that I’m a free agent I am having a go at getting back into my photography. I’ve come alive again and want to see and do more.
    Would love meet up with you and have a chat. You’re really inspiring and would love to get some tips of you with blogging.
    Samantha Eloise xx

  • First Night Design

    I know exactly what you’ve been going through. It took me far too long to concede I was getting nowhere as an actress. I plugged on and on but it was the having to use a wheelchair and not finding the casting directors or anyone else involved in the casting process as politically correct as one might have hoped ,as well as the desperation of needing to earn a living that turned me into a digital artist and to concentrate on my writing! I can’t say I’m earning a proper living but I’m getting the satisfaction I had only felt when acting. Break a leg for everything you now turn your hand to, Katy!
    Sarah

  • Really inspirational blog. Life doesn’t alway pan out how you imagine, but that’s part of the excitement I guess! :)

  • Oh Katy, I absolutely love this post – I’m a big fan of baring your soul on the internet so good on you for writing this! I can totally relate to all of this and I want to tell you that you haven’t failed and I don’t think you should see it as quitting. That was just one chapter of your life and your now moving onto the next. I’m 31 (I know a total granny in the blogging land) and I can’t tell you how many jobs/careers/ventures/projects/hobbies I’ve been through in the last decade. I sometimes lament the fact that I haven’t found the ‘one’ thing that I’m ‘meant’ to be doing but I’m really not sure I ever will. All I ve ever wanted to do is be creative and I’ve learned over the years that that comes in many forms. I too have days where I feel like I’ve failed at every venture I’ve ever attempted but then on the days where I’m kinder to myself I remember that we grow as people too as we get older and our interests and passions and priorities change as we go. I think often people in the creative industries feel this kind of failure and it’s because the creative industries are some of the hardest industries to make your mark in, and I can imagine that acting is one of THE hardest of all. They often come with no direction, no gratification and no money and we are all just supposed to go through life loving what we do and doing it all just for the ‘passion’. But it’s not a bad thing to want stability and to want to be able to pay your bills and enjoy your life so don’t beat yourself up about that. You gave it a good go, which is more than most can say, and the experience and training and confidence it provided you will know doubt put you in good stead for the future. Honestly, these days I think it’s very unusual for anyone to have one career for their whole lives, so roll with whatever makes you passionate right now and see where it leads! You never know what the future holds! And never think you weren’t good enough – it just wasn’t your path. Big hugs for writing this! ❤️ Jac xxx

  • Rosie Ladkin

    I am quite literally in the same boat – I finally plucked up the courage to write a very similar post on my blog (www.agirlonajourney.com) a few weeks back when I finalised my place at uni to study midwifery. It is really rubbish to feel like you’ve “quit”, I’ve decided to call it “moving on” – I could still be doing it, auditioning, selling my soul and pushing myself further into the depths of a depression it took me years to acknowledge properly, but I’ve decided to move on.
    Hats off to you for this post and your bravery to out and say it. There’s a lot of crap in the world of musical theatre, I know for me, it wasn’t half the industry I thought I was!

    If you need anyone in the same boat to rant to, I’m on Twitter at @rosieladkin, or get me on my blog.

    Lots of love from another actress who has been pushed away and has had to leave the industry she was so sure she was going to spend her life in.

    Rosie xxxx

    • Thank you so much for this Rosie! I’ve literally just read through about half your blog archives haha. I loved your change of path post!! Massive congratulations on getting into uni and best of luck with the midwife course :) xxx

    • Wow, I can’t believe how similar all our stories are (me and Rosie even both have the same journeying theme in our blogs). I trained in performance as well and am now retraining to be a mental health nurse starting September. I suffered with depression as well and I’m so glad that I’m moving on to a job which will allow me to do other things in my life which bring me joy, like Katy lists in her blog.
      I still want to carry on with the arts, and after working as a volunteer art therapy assistant I can see that the arts really do help improve lives. However, we have to consider our other goals and costs to our own lives as well.
      So glad to meet you both and please feel free to get in touch.

      Best wishes,

      Nicky xx
      http://www.curious-journeying.com

      • Rosie Ladkin

        Nicky – I totally get it, and it does totally seem like we are on the same page – I’m also going back to uni in september to train to become a midwife!
        All my love and please do stay in touch – I wanna hear all about your journey! :-) R xxx

  • Zoe

    love this post!!! I currently have your life from a few years ago (I work at spoons like you did while i’m at uni lol). Good on you for taking that step, and I’m so glad you’re happy and doing well now! xx

  • Hanna

    Life really is about the journey. It’s hurtful to have something you worked so hard for not happen but something else is always around the corner. –Hanna Lei

  • Sammie

    Well done for baring your soul and being so honest. I love your blog and hope that you can make a career out of it. Sammie x

  • Good for you, Katy! Sometimes plans change and you’re completely right to follow happiness. Once upon a time I was going to become a Solicitor. I literally can’t think of anything worse now haha! It’s all about enjoying life & doing what makes you happy. :)

    T x

  • Well done for quitting, Katy! I don’t think it’s a failure to have the courage to leave things that make you unhappy. It’s a success, I think ;)

  • Well done for quitting, Katy! I don’t think it’s a failure to have the courage to leave things that make you unhappy. It’s a success, I think ;)

  • Quitting definitely isn’t something to be ashamed of if it’s the breath of fresh air you needed, so well done for taking yours! It definitely takes courage to stand up and say, “I tried, but it still didn’t work”. All the respect.

    Tore | http://www.atinymew.com xo

  • Lauren

    Preach, sista, preach! It’s ok to give on something, to change your mind and to shift your priorities. I too am a “failed” actor and it took me a hell of a long time to admit it! You are so lucky to have found a new passion and something that you clearly have a talent for (I’ve been following your blog for a while now!!). It’s a brave thing to stand up and admit that the thing you’ve spent so much time, energy and money on is not the thing for you. Enjoy that gin, you earned it!
    Lauren x
    http://www.allthels.wordpress.com

  • RELATING. ON. EVERY. SINGLE. LEVEL.
    From chasing the dream, to caring too much of what others think, to literally the acting thing, which was all I wanted to be up until I was about 20 when I had my dreams crushed by a cruel casting agent!

    I think it’s great to admit your wanted other things, and well done for speaking up about it…
    BUT….can i just point something out, this is something I tell myself every time I think about my failed acting career: That career path has no age limit! In fact it’s probably something we can decide to pick back up in the future – Harrison Ford was still a carpenter at my age (30), Alan Rickman didn’t begin acting till 42, Julie Walters 32, Sam L Jackson was 46, Morgan Freeman was in his 50’s.

    Maybe your perfect role requires you to be much older with plenty more life experience under your belt. Maybe you are just prepping yourself for the ultimate role :)

    x tink jayne x
    allaboutink.co.uk

    • Thank you so much lovely!!! <3 I'm so glad you found it relatable and THANK YOU for the reminder about no age limit! There's been a few people mentioning that I don't have to give up completely and I've actually really been thinking about it a lot since I wrote this. I think it's definitely something I'm going to keep an eye on looking to the future :)

      So yeah: THANK YOU!!! <3

  • You know what, good on you for giving it a try. I left my acting dreams behind when I went to uni and ill always regret not giving it a go

  • Lauren Aitchison

    Loved this! I had to admit defeat with journalism after slaving away at it but in general, I am so much happier now. Like you! x

  • Lucy

    Oh my goodness! This post is like me 100% and i was worried it was just me!
    I myself went to uni to do a full 3 years BA Hons Acting degree and put my heart and soul into it. Ever since a young age i have done acting and due to me getting ill at 13 (become diagnosed with anorexia at the age of 13) i just kept with it because i literally had no interest in anything and thought i should be doing acting…it was sort of a coping mechanism and a form of escapism no i look back on it.
    In my 3rd year of uni i started to realised that acting was probably not my passion and was worried that i had wasted my degree.
    It was not a waste as any degree is valuable in many ways but i do admit that sometimes i wish i had done something different ….but i goes that wasn’t my fault, it was because of my illness.
    Now that i am trying all i can to recover, i am finding interests in different things, like yourself blogging being one of them and wanting to get into blogging as a career (i know its a big dream but gotta start somewhere). Because of my illness too i am interested in health and nutrition, all of which combined with blogging ar what i would now love to get into.
    I had to let go of the acting and it did scare me that people would judge me and think i just ‘wasted’ my time for nothing but i have to do what is right for me and what i love…and thats not acting.

    Totally loved your post and hope to create a blog as good as yours! :-)
    Great work! xxx

    blog – http://lucyvhouse.blogspot.co.uk

  • Danielle Levy

    Such an amazing post Katy, I thought and worked all the way up to about 18 years old that I was going to be in theatre when ‘I grew up’, to which I quit and ended up working towards a career in nursing (something I am 10x happier in). Something I’d always been told by family I was perfect for and I’ve never been more happy to be starting a job in intensive care in just over a month!

    It takes so much courage to write a post like this Katy, you are amazing and so brave!

    Danielle xx http://www.daniellelevy.co.uk

  • Katherine Thousand

    Finally quitting to live a life you can love, and being able to admit that you weren’t meant for your dream… That is so brave. I hope you are finding all the happiness that you deserve :)

    Ps – I love your writin style, it’s very pleasant to read!

    Xo Katherine (www.scoutingforsanity.com)

  • Amy

    I am very late to the party reading this, but I wanted to say how wonderful a read this was, from someone in the same place.

    Though I have to disagree with your wording of saying you weren’t good enough. The acting industry isn’t about being good enough, or talented, unfortunately. It’s about timing and luck. Working in theatre, I was surrounded by people who didn’t give up, or quit, and were some of the most insanely talented people I had ever come across, their total job count? 0, maybe 1 or 2. They were slaving away, working in theatre and doing shifts front and back of house for pennies, to be able to afford headshots, lessons etc. Whilst I admire them for not giving up, it further showed me that so little of that world has to do with talent or being good enough. The truth is, so many people are good enough, SO good enough, but don’t ever get a chance to show that they are. That’s why I had to walk away. I’m now working in he corporate world and enjoying my life, enjoying having money for once, I’m so glad that doing the same has worked out for you.

    Never think you weren’t good enough though, please.

    Amy
    http://www.coffeeshopcatharsis.com

  • Great post! Love how honest you are and appreciate your bravery to actually public this kind of “failure” post. I don’t see it as a failure though, you were very passionate and actively working for what you want from early age on. Those are some awesome characteristics!! :)
    Good luck with blog :)
    Madara
    http://lookforsmile.com